Science in Seconds at the Beach : Exciting Experiments You Can Do in Ten Minutes or Less

Wiley

$ 12.95 
SKU: 60-8993

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Do fish close their eyes?

Can you hold your breath longer than a whale?

How is sand made?

Why do we hear the ocean in empty seashells?

Surf's up for fantastic science fun with these quick, easy experiments and activities from Jean Potter. You can complete each in just ten minutes or less, and the clear step-by-step instructions and illustrations help you get it right every time. The projects help you learn about everything from how seaweed can forecast the weather to why waves break as they reach the shore. You will find most of the required materials already in your toy chest, home, backyard, or around your neighborhood.
The nearly 100 activities in this book investigate the many mysteries of animals, plants, sand, shells, sun, and water. You'll discover why there usually are more clouds over water than over land and why the sand on top of the beach is warm but cool underneath. Use a piece of hard candy to find out why beach and river rocks become smooth or learn how to clean water with sand —all with the help of a leading educator.

ISBN: 978-0-471-17899-6
128 pages
May 1998, Jossey-Bass

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